Bee Hive Removal Strategy

Bee hive removal is a very serious issue. You shouldn’t even consider doing it yourself if you have an allergy to bee stings, or if there is any chance that you could be allergic (such as never having been stung before). If you are definitely allergic to bees, then call a professional! That being said, if you know you aren’t allergic and you’re only trying to get rid of one hive, then you stand a pretty good chance at being able to remove the hive yourself. There are several ways to do this—not all of them smart or effective—but the particular method we are going to talk about will provide the best results and put you at the least amount of risk.

Before we get started with the strategy for bee hive removal, it’s important to make sure that you have the appropriate safeguards in place to protect yourself from bee stings. Professionals recommend wearing light colored clothes that have a smooth texture. You should also abstain from wearing cologne, perfume, deodorant, or even showering right before going out on your bee hive removal mission. Remember that bees love flowers, and many perfumes and deodorizers contain the oils of flowers.

If you haven’t already spotted the bee hive, but have simply noticed a bunch of bees in the area, then you definitely need to make locating the hive your priority. Bees like places where they feel they won’t be disturbed but can gain access to very easily. This is often why they make their hives in porch roofs or overhangs on the house, as well as in attics and chimneys. If you have noticed bees in your home on a frequent basis, it is likely that the hive is located somewhere in your home. The best time to consider removal is late winter or early spring when the colony is at its smallest. It’s also good to remember that bees are more dormant during the evening and early morning.

The best strategy for removing bees seems to be the use of an insecticide. Good reports have been associated with Sevin, but you can feel free to search among the brands offered at your local store. The idea is to spray the insecticide into the opening of the bee hive in order to increase your chances of killing the majority of the colony. If you aren’t comfortable spraying directly into the opening or believe you can’t do so safely, then you should aim to coat the entire hive from the outside. Again, the insecticide should be applied when the bees are dormant, so try to do so in the early morning or evening time. When spraying the insecticide dust, be sure to keep a good distance away from the hive, as some bees will leave the hive.

Don’t be surprised if there are still bees in the hive later on. The first application is not going to kill all of the bees, but it will get rid of the majority of them. Spray the hive every 24 hours until all of the bees are dead. After inspecting the hive and ensuring that all of the bees are dead, you need to remove the hive from the residence. This is important because bees from other colonies have no problem moving into an old colony’s nest. It is advisable to wear gloves when removing the nest, just in case the jostling happens to release a survivor or two. The hive should then be placed in a durable bag, such as a trash bag, and tie the opening off. Simply place the bag out with the rest of your trash on pick up day.

If the bee hive was located in a place near or on your home, be sure to seal up any cracks or entry crevices that might attract future bee colonies. You may also want to clean up the area with soap and water to get rid of any sticky honey or hive residue. Just remember that bee hive removal is a dangerous task whether you are allergic or not. If you have any reserves about removing the hive yourself, that might be a good indicator that you should call a professional.


 

 


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